Dresden Der Film

Week 32, 2012
Joensuu, Finland

Film: Dresden
Language: German (original)
Genre: drama, war, romance

I just watched Dresden Der Film and it created  an impact.  I am not a moviegoer neither an expert on films. I watch films just when I feel like it and I rank them according on how much the film manages to get me involve in it.  I know a strange ranking system, but that is how it works inside me. If the film triggers my inner, then it is a good film for me. Once the film enters the category of a good film then I can analyze why and how it moved me. As I said, I follow a strange method or as Mónica tells me, I have my carolingio language 😛

As I am collecting in this blog, at some level, the things that influence me, after watch this film, I decide I should start to mention some films too.

By chance I start to watch Dresden. It turns out that this is the first film I watch from the WWII produced by Germans. For me the film was intense and let me thinking a lot about my Germans. During and after the film, made resonance what I have read in the book of Berlin at war.

My focus of attention in the film was not the romantic triangle, which is the fictional narrative in the film. I was astonished by the historical events that the film transmits, and its message in general. Later I found the review of C. Markuss explaining why the screen is excellent. In his words:

“I found the screenplay to be excellent, at times combining satire with pathos, and the more evil aspects of the Third Reich are cleverly woven into the film – the German nurse married to a Jew, both hoping the war will end soon, the corrupt Nazi Gauleiter and his officials long on rhetoric but short on integrity and political awareness as Germany slowly tips into the abyss, and the doctors who illegally trade morphine for tickets and passports to Switzerland for themselves and their families. The scenes of destruction and suffering make compelling viewing, and the use of British actors to play the RAF personnel and show their point of view makes for a balanced film, particularly the scene showing German civilians lynching enemy air-crew, something also done earlier both in France and the UK on occasions. The use of Britons to play the RAF personnel also avoids those irritating foreign accents.”

It is amazing to perceive our human nature in extreme moments. Also I experience an honest respect to get a glimpse of our history, to what our ancestors have passed. Still processing…..

Dresden

Dresden

Image from here

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