Category Archives: Suomi

D18/15 — Values and Trust

Week 6, 2018
Turku, Finland

This weekend Finland showed me what it is made of.  This is a new perspective. I already recognize its SISU, as I have talked even at events (example here).  

In this weekend I learn about  values and trust. Here are the specific examples.

*** Saturday

At the K-market , which is a chain of supermakets, I bought an electrical house appliance because it had 30% of discount for store affiliates.  My companion to the store holds the store’s card, so we bought this machine. Once at the cashier I paid my bill with a debit card. When I got my receipt, I notice the system did not reflect the 30% off my purchase. This discount should appear automatically on the bill and it did not. So, as soon as I notice the discount was missing  we told that to the cashier.  Then, the cashier made a phone call, apparently to check what happen, and once she hang up, the following happen:

  1. The cashier clicked something at its “computer” and gave me a new “ticket”.
  2. I signed this new “ticket”, as the cashier informed she was returning me the money of all my shopping to my card.  Note: I did not put my card on the card-reader to proceed with this step. 
  3. After signing, the cashier printed a new receipt with the total of my shopping, now showing the 30% off (note: this was done based based on what the cashier’s “computer”  has recorded because the items were not registered again). 
  4. I paid this new ticket by adding my card into the card-reader. 
  5. We left the store as nothing had happened. The cashier did not give me any paper proving what has happened (the return of the money at least). 

I was anxious, to be honest. My companion, who is Finnish, was certain that everything will be ok. Myself, honestly, I was not trusting the system 100% and I was concern what would happen if they charge me both amounts.  24hrs later, I can confirm that my bank account only shows the second payment. The first one was, indeed eliminated.

Still, I feel strange that all this process is done without a hard-copy proof of the event, with the cashier and without “supervision”. It is amazing the trust on the system.  Also the values of everybody to make the system work.

*** Sunday

We went to play bowling, and the shoes were without surveillance.

I have never seen this, and I have been in different countries playing bowling. The shoes are always behind someone who is controlling them.  If you think it is because is a small city, well, I think with 182k inhabitants (as it is registered by 2014) it is evident that the trust on people is present.  Customer behave and respect the property of this business.

I only can say, Finland, I take my hat off as a sign of respect to you. You have incredible values and trust. 

— CAIS

We are learning Finnish – Me opimme suomea — 002

Week 4
Joensuu, Finland

Koli’s story (presented in October) serves its goal to make me practice Finnish. In addition, I have shown it a couple of time, and it seems other like it too.  🙂  So, I hope it helps!

Now it is time for the second story. This second story has vocabulary related to a hairdresser. This is not such a good story, but it has a lot of vocabulary that I know I need.

SIDE NOTE:  A personal goal is to be able to interact in Finnish in this 2017, thus I need to look for different support sources, To guide me on the language structure, I use an “old” book of mine entitle: “From Start to Finnish” by Leila White. I am NOT starting from zero. At the moment I am in Unit 5. Thus some exercises on my story are related to that particular unit.

To see the story on a full screen click here.

*** Vocabulary:
Leikata -to cut, to trim
Tarvitsen — I need something
Minun pitää — I need to (do something)
Lyhentää — to cut (hair )
Johdatus — introduction
varten — for
nopea — fast
käynti — visit
suositella — to recommend
usein — often
ennen — before
etukäteen — before hand
tapaaminen — appointment
lyhyt — short
halula – to want
vaalea — blond
Käyttää — to use

And the negative conjugation.

 

We are learning Finnish – Me opimme suomea — 001

Week 42
Joensuu, Finland

For people who are native speakers of western European languages are,  some how, indulge to learn “easily” languages that are close to each other. For example, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian, belong to a same family: Romance Languages. Without any expertise on linguistics, just as Spanish native speaker I know that those languages use the same alphabet and several words have similar roots. In the case of Finnish language, the only similarity I found with the other of western European languages is the alphabet because nothing else relates to it.

As native Spanish speaker, learning Finnish has been painful.  However, I am reaching a moment that I must learn it.

As a student of Finnish as second language, that frustrates me is the lack of vocabulary. I wish to have person who can read me over and over the same story until I get it and I memorize the words.   Yes, one can find exercises on several books to learn Finnish must of them are not meaningful for me or my needs. It is a bit frustrating because I need to learn the language and I cannot dedicate to study only the language and what I learn I do not feel it useful.

So, instead to complain I take action and I start this serie of posts: learning Finnish (oppiminen suomalainen) where I will write stories of what I learn in Finnish based on my activities in Finland. This exercise I know it will help me to learn the language, ans simultaneously I assume it will help others who are learning the language, to go through interactive stories that will help them to practice their language acquisition as well.

Wondering how will be my Finnish in one year form now! 🙂

Note: In the stories I assume reader have some level of basics on the language, i.e.  some verbs, prepositions. Taking into account my own level, it will be as being in the half of a book of any very first level of Finnish language.

Key words to remember:

  • upea = magnificent, gorgeous
  • maisema = landscape
  • kuten = like

To see the story in a full screen window, click here.